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Metformin 500 mg

$18.00$49.00

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Price/Tablet: $0.40
Generic Name: Metformin
Manufacturer: Various
Brand names: Glucophage, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza, Obimet, Diabex, Diaformin, and others

Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic drug from the biguanide class. It is the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, particularly in overweight and obese people and those with normal kidney function, and evidence suggests it may be the best choice for people with heart failure.

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Description and Brand Names

Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

US Brand Name

  1. Fortamet
  2. Glucophage
  3. Glucophage XR
  4. Glumetza
  5. Riomet

Descriptions

 

Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy.

Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your doctor will teach you what to do if this happens.

Metformin does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections.

This medicine is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Tablet, Extended Release
  • Tablet
  • Solution
  • Tablet, Extended Release, 24 HR
  • Before Using

    Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex

    In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

    Allergies

    Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

    Pediatric

    Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of metformin oral solution, extended-release oral suspension, and tablets in children 10 to 16 years of age. However, safety and efficacy of metformin extended-release tablets in the pediatric population have not been established.

    Geriatric

    Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of metformin have not been performed in the geriatric population, geriatric-specific problems are not expected to limit the usefulness of metformin in the elderly. However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related kidney problems, which may require caution in patients receiving metformin. This medicine is not recommended in patients 80 years of age and older who have kidney problems.

    Breastfeeding

    There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

    Drug Interactions

    Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

    Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

    • Acetrizoic Acid
    • Diatrizoate
    • Ethiodized Oil
    • Iobenzamic Acid
    • Iobitridol
    • Iocarmic Acid
    • Iocetamic Acid
    • Iodamide
    • Iodipamide
    • Iodixanol
    • Iodohippuric Acid
    • Iodopyracet
    • Iodoxamic Acid
    • Ioglicic Acid
    • Ioglycamic Acid
    • Iohexol
    • Iomeprol
    • Iopamidol
    • Iopanoic Acid
    • Iopentol
    • Iophendylate
    • Iopromide
    • Iopronic Acid
    • Ioseric Acid
    • Iosimide
    • Iotasul
    • Iothalamate
    • Iotrolan
    • Iotroxic Acid
    • Ioxaglate
    • Ioxitalamic Acid
    • Ipodate
    • Metrizamide
    • Metrizoic Acid
    • Tyropanoate Sodium

    Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

    • Aspirin
    • Balofloxacin
    • Besifloxacin
    • Bupropion
    • Ciprofloxacin
    • Dasabuvir
    • Dofetilide
    • Dolutegravir
    • Enoxacin
    • Fleroxacin
    • Flumequine
    • Gatifloxacin
    • Gemifloxacin
    • Ioversol
    • Lanreotide
    • Levofloxacin
    • Lomefloxacin
    • Moxifloxacin
    • Nadifloxacin
    • Norfloxacin
    • Octreotide
    • Ofloxacin
    • Ombitasvir
    • Paritaprevir
    • Pasireotide
    • Pazufloxacin
    • Pefloxacin
    • Pioglitazone
    • Prulifloxacin
    • Ritonavir
    • Rufloxacin
    • Sitagliptin
    • Sparfloxacin
    • Tafenoquine
    • Thioctic Acid
    • Tosufloxacin
    • Vandetanib

    Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

    • Acebutolol
    • Atenolol
    • Betaxolol
    • Bisoprolol
    • Bitter Melon
    • Carteolol
    • Carvedilol
    • Celiprolol
    • Esmolol
    • Fenugreek
    • Furazolidone
    • Glucomannan
    • Guar Gum
    • Iproniazid
    • Isocarboxazid
    • Labetalol
    • Levobunolol
    • Linezolid
    • Methylene Blue
    • Metipranolol
    • Metoprolol
    • Moclobemide
    • Nadolol
    • Nebivolol
    • Nialamide
    • Oxprenolol
    • Patiromer
    • Penbutolol
    • Phenelzine
    • Pindolol
    • Practolol
    • Procarbazine
    • Propranolol
    • Psyllium
    • Ranolazine
    • Rasagiline
    • Rifampin
    • Safinamide
    • Selegiline
    • Sotalol
    • Timolol
    • Tranylcypromine
    • Verapamil

    Other Interactions

    Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

    Other Medical Problems

    The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

    • Alcohol, excessive use or
    • Underactive adrenal glands or
    • Underactive pituitary gland or
    • Undernourished condition or
    • Weakened physical condition or
    • Any other condition that causes low blood sugar—Patients with these conditions may be more likely to develop low blood sugar while taking metformin.
    • Anemia (low levels of red blood cells) or
    • Vitamin B12 deficiency—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
    • Congestive heart failure, acute or unstable or
    • Dehydration or
    • Heart attack, acute or
    • Hypoxemia (decreased oxygen in the blood) or
    • Kidney disease or
    • Liver disease or
    • Sepsis (blood poisoning) or
    • Shock (low blood pressure, blood circulation is poor)—A rare condition called lactic acidosis can occur. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about this.
    • Diabetic ketoacidosis (ketones in the blood) or
    • Kidney disease, severe or
    • Metabolic acidosis (extra acids in the blood) or
    • Type 1 diabetes—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
    • Fever or
    • Infection or
    • Surgery or
    • Trauma—These conditions may cause temporary problems with blood sugar control and your doctor may want to treat you with insulin.

Proper Use

This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor.

Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed.

Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment.

Swallow the tablet or extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it.

While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about.

Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid.

Use the supplied dosing cup to measure the mixed extended-release oral suspension. Ask your pharmacist for a dosing cup if you do not have one.

Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way.

You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For type 2 diabetes:
    • For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets):
      • Adults—
        • Metformin alone (Fortamet®): At first, 1000 milligrams (mg) once a day taken with the evening meal. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2500 mg per day.
        • Metformin alone (Glucophage® XR): At first, 500 mg once daily with the evening meal. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2000 mg per day.
        • Metformin alone (Glumetza®): At first, 500 mg once a day taken with the evening meal. Then, your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2000 mg per day.
        • Metformin with a sulfonylurea: Your doctor will determine the dose of each medicine.
        • Metformin with insulin: At first, 500 mg once a day. Then, your doctor may increase your dose by 500 mg every week if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2500 mg per day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For oral dosage form (extended-release suspension):
      • Adults—At first, 5 milliliters (mL) once a day taken with the evening meal. Your doctor may increase your dose by 5 mL weekly if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 20 mL per day.
      • Children 10 to 16 years of age—At first, 5 mL once a day taken with the evening meal. Your doctor may increase your dose by 5 mL weekly if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 20 mL per day.
      • Children younger than 10 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For oral dosage form (solution):
      • Adults—
        • Metformin alone: At first, 5 milliliters (mL) two times a day, or 8.5 mL once a day with meals. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 25.5 mL per day.
        • Metformin with a sulfonylurea: Your doctor will determine the dose of each medicine.
        • Metformin with insulin: At first, 5 mL once a day. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 25 mL per day.
      • Children 10 to 16 years of age—At first, 5 mL two times a day with meals. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 20 mL per day.
      • Children younger than 10 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • Adults—
        • Metformin alone: At first, 500 milligrams (mg) two times a day taken with the morning and evening meals, or 850 mg a day taken with the morning meal. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. Later, your doctor may want you to take 500 or 850 mg two to three times a day with meals. However, the dose is usually not more than 2550 mg per day.
        • Metformin with a sulfonylurea: Your doctor will determine the dose of each medicine.
        • Metformin with insulin: At first, 500 mg a day. Your doctor may increase your dose by 500 mg every week if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2500 mg per day.
      • Children 10 to 16 years of age—At first, 500 mg two times a day taken with the morning and evening meals. Your doctor may increase your dose if needed until your blood sugar is controlled. However, the dose is usually not more than 2000 mg per day.
      • Children younger than 10 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

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Metformin 500 mg

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